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Brazilian Meat Production Ready for Decade of Growth

25 June 2012
Meat & Livestock Australia

BRAZIL - Meat production in Brazil is forecast to grow significantly over the next decade, according to the latest Brazilian Agricultural Department (MAPA) forecast. Chicken production will experience the fastest growth, followed by beef and pork. Brazil was the world’s second largest beef exporting nation in 2011, behind Australia, exporting 1.3 million tonnes cwt of beef.

Brazilian beef production is expected to increase 32 per cent between 2011-12 and 2021-22, reaching 11.8 million tonnes by the end of the decade. While production is forecast to increase significantly, domestic consumption should almost keep pace, rising 27 per cent over the ten year period, to 9.427 million tonnes. Exports will absorb the rest of the growth in production, forecast to increase 20%, reaching 1.6 million tonnes cwt by 2021-22. Strong economic growth within Brazil has led to a surging middle class, with per capita beef consumption increasingly in recent years.

Chicken production is expected to increase 56 per cent over the ten year period, to 20.3 million tonnes. Brazil is the world’s largest chicken exporter, shipping 3.2 million tonnes of chicken in 2011. Pork production will also increase, up 22 per cent, to 4.1 million tonnes by 2021-22.

Russia is Brazil’s largest market for beef and pork, while Japan is the largest market for chicken. Brazil has faced market access issues into Russia in recent years, with a partial ban placed on Brazilian beef in June 2011. This has limited beef exports to the market, with any further ban likely to impact on Brazilian total exports. In 2011, Brazil exported 228,822 tonnes swt to Russia, a 20 per cent decrease on 2010 levels, while Australian exports to Russia totalled 54,088 tonnes swt.

TheCattleSite News Desk


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